Festival of Lights

Diwali is here!!

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

In the Gregorian calendar, Diwali typically falls in late October or early November. The term “Diwali” originates from the Sanskrit word “dipavali,” signifying a “row of lights.”

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

In the Gregorian calendar, Diwali typically falls in late October or early November. The term “Diwali” originates from the Sanskrit word “dipavali,” signifying a “row of lights.”

Diwali commemorates the return of Rama, Sita, Lakshmana, and Hanuman to Ayodhya following their victory over the ten-headed demon king, Ravana.

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

In the Gregorian calendar, Diwali typically falls in late October or early November. The term “Diwali” originates from the Sanskrit word “dipavali,” signifying a “row of lights.”

The festival also honors Krishna’s conquest of the demon Narakasura in South India. 

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

In the Gregorian calendar, Diwali typically falls in late October or early November. The term “Diwali” originates from the Sanskrit word “dipavali,” signifying a “row of lights.”

The festival also honors Krishna’s conquest of the demon Narakasura in South India. 

Some celebrates Diwali as Lakshmi’s birthday, while others use the occasion to celebrate Lakshmi and Vishnu’s marriage.

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

In the Gregorian calendar, Diwali typically falls in late October or early November. The term “Diwali” originates from the Sanskrit word “dipavali,” signifying a “row of lights.”

The festival also honors Krishna’s conquest of the demon Narakasura in South India. 

Some celebrates Diwali as Lakshmi’s birthday, while others use the occasion to celebrate Lakshmi and Vishnu’s marriage.

 It begins on the second day of the bright half of the lunar month Karttika and concludes on the thirteenth day of the dark half of the lunar month Ashvina.

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

In the Gregorian calendar, Diwali typically falls in late October or early November. The term “Diwali” originates from the Sanskrit word “dipavali,” signifying a “row of lights.”

The festival also honors Krishna’s conquest of the demon Narakasura in South India. 

Some celebrates Diwali as Lakshmi’s birthday, while others use the occasion to celebrate Lakshmi and Vishnu’s marriage.

 It begins on the second day of the bright half of the lunar month Karttika and concludes on the thirteenth day of the dark half of the lunar month Ashvina.

The doors and windows of homes are left open, symbolizing the anticipation of Lakshmi’s arrival and the bestowing of prosperity and triumph upon the inhabitants.

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

Diwali is a major religious holiday for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists also celebrate it.

In the Gregorian calendar, Diwali typically falls in late October or early November. The term “Diwali” originates from the Sanskrit word “dipavali,” signifying a “row of lights.”

The festival also honors Krishna’s conquest of the demon Narakasura in South India. 

Some celebrates Diwali as Lakshmi’s birthday, while others use the occasion to celebrate Lakshmi and Vishnu’s marriage.

 It begins on the second day of the bright half of the lunar month Karttika and concludes on the thirteenth day of the dark half of the lunar month Ashvina.

The doors and windows of homes are left open, symbolizing the anticipation of Lakshmi’s arrival and the bestowing of prosperity and triumph upon the inhabitants.